Roman-Style Gnocchi (Gnocchi alla Romana) with Semolina Flour

An easy Italian pasta recipe for an impressive dish that can be prepared in advance for a great dinner with guests! And, as every recipe in my blog, that’s the best Gnocchi alla Romana recipe that I know of, so it’s a keeper!


roman style gnocchi semolina best easy romana perfect

Gnocchi alla Romana (pron. nyoh-k-kee uh-L-luh rome-uh-nuh) is a typical italian recipe from Lazio region and especially, as the name suggests it, from the city of Rome.

Gnocchi always scare a lot of people, because it’s said that they’re not easy to make, but these Gnocchi are not like those made with potatoes or ricotta but are made with semolina flour so it’s easier to deal with (have you tried my delicious Potato Gnocchi recipesuper easy even for a newbie!).

Here you just need to cook semolina flour into some milk and then spread the dough over a silpat or a baking paper and leave it too cool before shaping and cooking. Therefore super easy and quick!

best roman style gnocchi semolina

The classic Roman-Style Gnocchi recipe provide for a butter and cheese sauce but they can be served with a delicious Bechamèl sauce, a Mornay Sauce, or a sauce mixed with some ham, bacon or pancetta or with your favourite vegetables. In the dough you can also put some chopped greens such as spinach, nettle, chicory, etc.. So you can use your imagination and customize this dish to your liking!

You can also have fun choosing the form for these Gnocchi alla Romana! In Rome they usually shape gnocchi in circles while outside they use to cut the dough in squares or in rhombus. But nobody forbid you to create these semolina gnocchi in the shape that you want and you can even put the dough into a piping bag with a large tip and make some roses or something like that.

I adapted this recipe from an italian chef called Montersino and I like it because these Gnocchi alla Romana are not tough like others but tender inside with a thin crunchy crust and tastier!

So great results with low efforts! What more?

semolina gnocchi best recipe

parmigiano reggiano discount

Roman-Style Gnocchi (Gnocchi alla Romana) with Semolina Flour

Difficulty: easy
Preparation: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 5-6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 250 gr / 8.8 oz/ 1 1/2 cup semolina flour (or semola rimacinata di grano duro)
  • 1 lt / 4 cups whole milk
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 100 gr / 3.5 oz / 3/4 cup butter (at fridge temperature)
  • 140 gr / 5 oz / 1 3/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano cheese finely grated + more for baking
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • a pinch of nutmeg

romana roman style gnocchi ingredients

Instructions:

In a heavy bottomed saucepan, bring the milk to a lightly simmer, then add salt, nutmeg and semolina flour then stir well with a whisk to avoid lumps.
Continue to stir with a wooden spoon and cook for at least 10 minutes, or until it begins to pull away from the sides of the saucepan. The mixture should be like some thick and firm mashed potatoes.

romana roman style gnocchi milk semolina

Remove from heat and add cold butter.

romana roman style gnocchi semolina butter

Add Parmigiano cheese and stir with a wooden spoon until all the butter is melted and absorbed.

romana roman style gnocchi semolina parmigiano

Quickly add the egg and yolks and stir until all is well mixed.

Now you need to choose the shape of your Gnocchi.

(If you want to use a piping bag, immediately put the dough in it because as it cools it will be not so easy to pipe)

Put the dough over a silpat or a baking paper, cover with a cling film or plastic wrap or another silpat and roll with a rolling-pin until it’s flattened to about 1-2 cm / 0.40-0.80 inches.

roman style gnocchi semolina dough

Leave to cool in the fridge for at least 1 hour.

roman style gnocchi semolina flat dough

As you can see from the picture above, I rolled half the dough into a rope to freeze it (I don’t have a big freezer), because the dough was too much for the three of us. Don’t do a rope if you don’t freeze it, because this dough is not tough enough to cut a neat slice. If you freeze the rope-dough, slice it right away when removed from the freezer (and bake as soon as you can).

Once cooled in the fridge, you can cut the dough in circles with a round pastry cutter (5-8 cm / 2-3 inches Ø) or in squares or rhombus with a knife. It the dough has not cooled enough and it’s sticky, plunge the cutter into some water to help you (or brush it with some extra virgin olive oil).

making roman style gnocchi

If you choose the classic form (circle) you can put the remaining pieces of dough under the circle ones in the baking pan. If the dough is still soft and mixable you can re-knead what is left and roll out again to make other Gnocchi.

Spread butter onto one or more casserole (to make some single serving dishes) or onto a baking pan.

Line up Gnocchi into the pan and, if you like, overlap them a bit.

Sprinkle some more Parmigiano Reggiano and/or Pecorino Romano cheese over Gnocchi.

roman style gnocchi ready bake

Pour some melted butter on.

roman style gnocchi semolina bake butter

Bake at 200°C / 425°F / gas mark 7 for about 20-30 minutes.

At the end, if Gnocchi don’t have a golden crust, just switch to the broil/grill setting for a couple of minutes.

And Roman-Style Gnocchi with semolina flour are ready to be served and gobbled up!

italian gnocchi roman style easy best

Roman-Style Gnocchi (Gnocchi alla Romana) with Semolina Flour
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Best authentic Italian Gnocchi alla Romana recipe.
Author:
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 5
Ingredients
  • 250 gr / 8.8 oz/ 1½ cup semolina flour (or semola rimacinata di grano duro)
  • 1 lt / 4 cups whole milk
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 100 gr / 3.5 oz / ¾ cup butter (at fridge temperature)
  • 140 gr / 5 oz / 1¾ cup Parmigiano Reggiano cheese finely grated + more for baking
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • a pinch of nutmeg
Instructions
  1. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, bring the milk to a lightly simmer, then add salt, nutmeg and semolina flour then stir well with a whisk to avoid lumps.
  2. Continue to stir with a wooden spoon and cook for at least 10 minutes, or until it begins to pull away from the sides of the saucepan. The mixture should be like some thick and firm mashed potatoes.
  3. Remove from heat and add cold butter.
  4. Add Parmigiano cheese and stir with a wooden spoon until all the butter is melted and absorbed.
  5. Quickly add the egg and yolks and stir until all is well mixed.
  6. Put the dough over a silpat or a baking paper, cover with a cling film or plastic wrap or another silpat and roll with a rolling-pin until it's flattened to about 1-2 cm / 0.40-0.80 inches.
  7. Leave to cool in the fridge for at least 1 hour.
  8. Once cooled in the fridge, you can cut the dough in circles with a round pastry cutter (5-8 cm / 2-3 inches Ø) or in squares or rhombus with a knife. It the dough has not cooled enough and it's sticky, plunge the cutter into some water to help you (or brush it with some extra virgin olive oil).
  9. If you choose the classic form (circle) you can put the remaining pieces of dough under the circle ones in the baking pan. If the dough is still soft and mixable you can re-knead what is left and roll out again to make other Gnocchi.
  10. Spread butter onto one or more casserole (to make some single serving dishes) or onto a baking pan.
  11. Line up Gnocchi into the pan and, if you like, overlap them a bit.
  12. Sprinkle some more Parmigiano Reggiano and/or Pecorino Romano cheese over Gnocchi.
  13. Pour some melted butter on.
  14. Bake at 200°C / 425°F / gas mark 7 for about 20-30 minutes.
  15. At the end, if Gnocchi don't have a golden crust, just switch to the broil/grill setting for a couple of minutes.

Milk-Braised Pork or Veal Loin with Fresh Herbs, Italian Style (Arrosto al Latte)

This is a family favourite recipe, very simple to make but amazingly good! The meat, pork or veal, comes out very tender and, although it takes quite some time to cook (but your constant attendance is not required), the milk, along with sage rosemary and garlic, reduces down to create a delicious brown sauce…. and has low calories!!!


milk braised pork veal loin roast arrosto maiale best italian herbs

Cooking meat in milk is common throughout north Italy because it results in moist meat and a flavorful sauce.
Here it’s called Arrosto al Latte (milk roast – pron. Rr-os-toh) even if it’s not cooked in the oven, in fact here we call something roast (especially meat) when it’s cooked over high heat and browned.

roasted pork veal loin milk italian herbs

In Tuscan the name for roast pork loin with ribs attached seasoned with rosemary, sage, garlic and pepper is Arista (R-east-uh). This derives, as Artusi said, from an ecumenical council held in Florence in 1430 to attempt to settle the differences between the Greek and Roman Churches, during which the Florentines served their guests this dish. The Greeks all began to exclaim, “Aristos!” (“the best” in greek) and the name stuck.
Arista in Tuscany is usually cooked with white wine instead of milk, but you can find both versions.

If you’re using Veal loin for this recipe, when it’s cold, you can cut it in very thin slices and cover them with the appropriate sauce to make a delicious “Vitello Tonnato” (Veal with Tuna Sauce – recipe in a next post)….. but if you don’t mind, you can use pork loin too to do this. 😀

Milk-Braised Pork or Veal Loin with Fresh Herbs, Italian Style (Arrosto al Latte)

Difficulty: easy
Preparation: 5 minutes Cooking Time: ~2 hours
Yield: 4

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 lbs / 1,3 kg boneless pork or veal loin, tied
  • ~10 sage leaves
  • 1 medium sprig of rosemary
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ~1 1/2 cup whole milk (for more info read the instructions)
  • salt and pepper to taste

pork loin italian herbs milk

Instructions:

Ask your butcher to tie the meat correctly before cooking or you can do this, it’s simpler as it seems (look at this accurate video for instructions).
This will ensure that the meat remains constant throughout the cooking process so that it cooks evenly and when you’ll cut the slices they’ll be uniform.

pork loin tied italian herbs milk

Season the loin well with salt and pepper (if you have Salamoia Bolognese or Seasonello Bologna salt use that).

Heat oil in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat and brown loin on all sides. This is important for the flavor and for the tenderness of the meat (it will take about 10 minutes to ensure all the edges are golden).

pork loin roast italian herbs

Stir in rosemary, sage and garlic and pour the milk in with the meat until it reaches about half the loin.

pork loin roast italian herbs milk

When the milk comes to boil lower the heat to low and partially cover the pan with a lid.

pork loin roast italian herbs milk lid

Cook the loin for at least 2 hours, or until the juices run clear when pierced with a skewer. If you have an instant thermometer, insert it into the center of the meat and it should read 65°-70°C / 150°-160°F for a slightly pink center, while if you want the loin to be well done it should read 165°-175°F / 75°-80°C.
Remember to turn the meat once or twice during the cooking time.

milk braised pork veal loin roast arrosto maiale

I like the meat to be well done, as you can see from the photos below, so I cook it for 3 hours (before cooking, the meat was at fridge temperature).

Remove the meat and put over a cutting board to rest, loosely covered with foil to keep warm.

At this point, the milk sauce should be thick, curdled and in a nutty brown colour. If it’s not so thick or you like a more dense sauce you can add 1/2+ teaspoon of flour (paying attention to dissolve it very well) and boil the sauce for 2 minutes.

arrosto milk juice

Remove and discard garlic, rosemary and sage from the milk sauce.

Now the sauce is ready, but if you don’t like serving the roast with some chunks of coagulated milk in it (it’s not pretty but they will melt in your mouth), you can whisk the sauce with a hand mixer to obtain a smooth sauce.

milk braised pork veal loin roast arrosto maiale sliced

Slice the loin (tip: the meat is easier to cut when it’s fridge cold!), pour over the milk sauce and serve (if you find, upon slicing the meat, that you’ve undercooked it, slip the slices and sauce in a pan and bring to a simmer until cooked through).

milk braised roast arrosto maiale italian best

Usually the roast is better the next day, so that the loin has time to absorb the flavours from the sauce.

If you’re using this recipe to make Vitello Tonnato (Veal with Tuna Sauce), just arrange the “dried” slices of roast on a serving plate and cover with the Tuna Sauce (in which you have whisked some milk sauce in – recipe in a next post).

When I cook this recipe I usually put the meat covered with foil in the fridge to chill, because this helps the cutting process, especially if you cut it in thin slices.

This recipe is very easy to follow, healthy and delicious, so it’s a keeper!

What’s you favourite recipe for Pork or Veal Loin?

milk braised pork veal loin roast arrosto maiale best italian

Milk-Braised Pork or Veal Loin with Fresh Herbs, Italian Style (Arrosto al Latte)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Pork or Veal Loin cooked in a milky sauce, authentic Italian style.
Author:
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 2½ lbs / 1,3 kg boneless pork or veal loin, tied
  • ~10 sage leaves
  • 1 medium sprig of rosemary
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ~1½ cup whole milk (for more info read the instructions)
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Tie the meat correctly before cooking.
  2. Season the loin well with salt and pepper (if you have Salamoia Bolognese or Seasonello Bologna salt use that).
  3. Heat oil in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat and brown loin on all sides.
  4. Stir in rosemary, sage and garlic and pour the milk in with the meat until it reaches about half the loin.
  5. When the milk comes to boil lower the heat to low and partially cover the pan with a lid.
  6. Cook the loin for at least 2 hours, or until the juices run clear when pierced with a skewer. If you have an instant thermometer, insert it into the center of the meat and it should read 65°-70°C / 150°-160°F for a slightly pink center, while if you want the loin to be well done it should read 165°-175°F / 75°-80°C.
  7. Remember to turn the meat once or twice during the cooking time.
  8. Remove the meat and put over a cutting board to rest, loosely covered with foil to keep warm.
  9. At this point, the milk sauce should be thick, curdled and in a nutty brown colour. If it's not so thick or you like a more dense sauce you can add ½+ teaspoon of flour (paying attention to dissolve it very well) and boil the sauce for 2 minutes.
  10. Remove and discard garlic, rosemary and sage from the milk sauce.
  11. Now the sauce is ready, but if you don't like serving the roast with some chunks of coagulated milk in it (it's not pretty but they will melt in your mouth), you can whisk the sauce with a hand mixer to obtain a smooth sauce.
  12. Slice the loin (tip: the meat is easier to cut when it's fridge cold!), pour over the milk sauce and serve (if you find, upon slicing the meat, that you’ve undercooked it, slip the slices and sauce in a pan and bring to a simmer until cooked through).

Béchamel Sauce (Besciamella) and my foolproof lump-free process

Béchamel Sauce or Besciamella in italian (beh-shuh-mel-luh), is one of the mother sauces of the french and italian cuisine but it’s also known as white sauce.
For someone it may be a little tricky because sometimes it turns out a bit lumpy, but trust me and follow my quick recipe and tips for a perfect foolproof lump-free sauce, Besciamella is a really simple and versatile sauce!


bechamel sauce besciamella best lump free

History tells that an earlier version of Besciamella was born in Tuscany named as “Salsa Colla” (Glue Sauce), consisted in slow cooked milk with meat broth, spices and cream, then it was imported in France (together to several other recipes like onion soup) by Catherine de’ Medici, the wife of King Henry II of France, and then was modified by a chef in honour of the “marquis de Béchamel”, who held the honorary post of chief steward to Louis XIV.

Nowadays, in Italy, Besciamella is most used in the Emilian cuisine especially in the Lasagne recipe, Cannelloni, Pasta al Forno (baked pasta) and 4 cheeses pasta.

But it’s also used with vegetables such as baked cauliflowers or broccoli (for that recipe I like to use a more flavorful sauce: bechamel plus egg yolks, cream and Parmigiano Reggiano cheese – called by chefs Mornay sauce – recipe in a next post).

Béchamel is made by melting butter with equal parts of flour in order to make a roux, which is cooked under low heat while stirring with a whisk and, because it’s a white sauce, you have to pay attention to not over brown the roux (a dark brown roux is usually used to thick roasted meats or stews so they will have more flavour, albeit less thickening power).

The roux is then mixed with nutmeg, heated milk, and it’s customary in Italy, especially in Emilia-Romagna, to add Parmigiano Reggiano cheese inside for a better taste. Then the sauce is cooked until thickened and smooth.

So, the final thickness of the sauce depends from the proportion between roux and milk and the cooking time, so if you want a more liquid Besciamella reduce the amount of roux, otherwise add more roux.

Béchamel Sauce (Besciamella) and my foolproof lump-free process

Difficulty: easy
Preparation: 1 minute Cooking Time: 15-20 minutes
Yield: ≈4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 4 1/4 cups / 1 lt milk (preferably not skimmed)
  • 8 tbsp / 80 gr all-purpose flour (sifted)
  • 8 tbsp / 80 gr unsalted butter
  • 2-3 pinches freshly grated nutmeg
  • salt to taste (1/4-1/2 tsp)
  • Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (optional)

Note: these quantities of butter and flour produce a medium-thick Béchamel, suitable for Lasagne or as a base for other sauces (generally you can use one to three tablespoons each of flour and butter per cup of milk – e.g. one tbsp of each for a thin sauce while three tbsp of each for an extra thick sauce).

Instructions:

In a medium saucepan heat the milk with salt until little bubbling, then remove from heat or you can heat milk in microwave to save time (pre-heating the milk will reduce the time of stirring and controlling the sauce while cooking).

butter flour

In another pan, melt the butter until foaming. Remove from heat, add flour, stir well with a whisk or a spoon and return to heat (if you don’t remove from heat the pan, the flour will cook too fast and lumps can be too difficult to dissolve).

roux

Every minute (or when necessary) stir with a wooden spoon over a low heat until the roux is blond/light gold and smooth (to me it took about 10-12 minutes), paying attention to not over brown it.

roux 2

Quickly add the nutmeg and mix well (adding nutmeg in the roux instead of in the milk will avoid the nutmeg to clump on the skin of the milk), remove from heat.

roux nutmeg

With one movement put all the roux into the scalded milk (into a saucepan). Stir with a whisk until smooth.

roux milk

Return to heat and simmer Besciamella, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon (or a whisk), until sauce comes to a boil, thickens and coats the back of a wooden spoon (about 5 minutes).

Wait 2-3 minutes (to allow flour to cook better) and then remove from heat (this will prevent the sauce from taste floury).

If desired add Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and stir a little bit.

Your perfectly smooth Besciamella is ready to be used however you like! (use it immediately as long as it’s hot, so it’s easier to deal with).

besciamella authentic italian lasagne

Béchamel Sauce (Besciamella) and my foolproof lump-free process
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
A quick recipe and tips for a perfect foolproof lump-free sauce, Besciamella is a really simple and versatile sauce.
Author:
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 4¼ cups / 1 lt milk (preferably not skimmed)
  • 8 tbsp / 80 gr all-purpose flour (sifted)
  • 8 tbsp / 80 gr unsalted butter
  • 2-3 pinches freshly grated nutmeg
  • salt to taste (1/4-1/2 tsp)
  • Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan heat the milk with salt until little bubbling or you can heat milk in microwave to save time.
  2. Remove from heat.
  3. In another pan, melt the butter until foaming.
  4. Remove from heat, add flour, stir well with a whisk or a spoon and return to heat.
  5. Every minute (or when necessary) stir with a wooden spoon over a low heat until the roux is blond/light gold and smooth (to me it took about 10-12 minutes), paying attention to not over brown it.
  6. Quickly add the nutmeg and mix well.
  7. Remove from heat.
  8. With one movement put all the roux into the scalded milk (into a saucepan).
  9. Stir with a whisk until smooth.
  10. Return to heat and simmer Besciamella, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon (or a whisk), until sauce comes to a boil, thickens and coats the back of a wooden spoon (about 5 minutes).
  11. Wait 2-3 minutes (to allow flour to cook better) and then remove from heat (this will prevent the sauce from taste floury).
  12. If desired add Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and stir a little bit.

How to remove bitterness from Aubergines / Eggplants

Everybody knows that aubergines/eggplants can have a bitter taste when cooked, especially those that are not so fresh.




Many of you already know that to remove the bitterness you just have to cut aubergine/eggplant in pieces (as desired), put them skin side down in a colander and sprinkle evenly with some salt. After 30 minutes and after being rinsed, aubergine/eggplant pieces are ready to be cooked, but remember to omit salt in the cooking process.

Another option, that maybe not all of you are aware of, is to soak pieces of aubergine/eggplant in milk for 30 minutes (at the end discard the milk that will be browned by the aubergine/eggplant juices).

I usually choose the second trick because I can control the saltiness and every bit of aubergine/eggplant is affected by the anti-bitterness process.

Do you know any other trick to remove the bitterness from aubergine/eggplant? Please, let me know!

Soft and Doughy Pizza By The Slice (Italian Pizza al Taglio)

My son doesn’t like flat pizza, so I had to learn how to make a really soft and doughy pizza like those you can find in an italian bakery (…or anywhere else).


pizza al taglio soft doughy italian best chicago style

I’ve already told you that I’m a very pizza addict, so here is a second recipe… while waiting for the 3rd! 😉

At home it’s mostly impossible to achieve because you would need professional ovens, so after months and months of kneading and baking I figured out how to do it (the secret for a very soft dough is just a potato)… and now my son is really happy (and I keep on baking…).

If you want to save time, like I often do, you can use instant mashed potato flour instead of steaming just one potato. So keep in mind that if you use a steamed potato you need to reduce the amount of water stated in the ingredients.

Pizza al taglio

Soft and Doughy Pizza (Italian Pizza al taglio)

Difficulty: easy
Preparation: 25 minutes Cooking Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 3/4 servings – 40cm x 30cm / 15″ x 12″ pizza pan

Ingredients for the dough:

  • 130 grams / 4.6 ounces / 1/2 cup milk (or water if you want a lighter version)
  • 200 grams / 7 ounces / 1 cup water* (less if using a steamed potato read below)
  • 10 grams / 1 tbsp granulated active dry yeast or 25 grams / 1/2 tbsp fresh yeast or 140 grams / 5 ounces mother yeast
  • 20 grams / 1 1/2 tbsp unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 20 grams / 1/4 cup instant mashed potatoes flour or 1 steamed and peeled potato (in this case use less water*)
  • 500 grams / 18 ounces / 4 cups all-purpose flour (or pizza/bread flour)
  • 10 grams / 1 full tsp sugar
  • 10 grams / 1 1/2 tsp salt

For the topping:

  • 1 cup plain chopped tomatoes sauce, plus a little pinch of sugar, salt to taste
  • other ingredients to your taste
  • fresh mozzarella, cut into 1.5 cm / 0.59 inches square pieces (making big pieces is important to prevent mozzarella from burning during the cooking time)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 230°C / 450°F / gas mark 8.
Dissolve yeast in warm water and/or milk, sugar and butter, then mix all the ingredients (add the remain water and salt at last) to form a smooth, soft and no sticky dough (If it’s too sticky add a little flour otherwise add more water). Knead for about 20 minutes.
Let rest for 5 minutes, cover your pizza pan with baking paper and roll out the dough.

Pizza al taglio dough

Cover with a lid or a plastic wrap to avoid the dough from drying and let rise for at least 2 hours (4 if using mother yeast).

Pizza al taglio dressing

Dress pizza with tomato sauce, other ingredients and mozzarella.

Pizza al taglio ready

Bake for about 20 minutes.

Pizza al taglio soft doughy

Pizza al Taglio, done!

IMPORTANT tips to know:

If you are using fresh or dry yeast (not mother yeast), I suggest you to greatly reduce the amount of yeast in recipes and, as a consequence, to extend the rising time.
A slow fermentation allow a better maturation of the dough with more digestible, more flavorful and tastier pizzas.
So here are the times I suggest you for 500 grams/18 ounces/4 cups of flour (that usually require 10 grams/1 tbsp granulated dry yeast or 25 grams / 1/2 tbsp fresh yeast for 2 hours of rising time):

  • 4 h of rising time -> use 1/2 amount of yeast;
  • 6 h of rising time -> use 1/4 amount of yeast;
  • 8 h of rising time -> use 1/8 amount of yeast;
  • 10 h of rising time -> use 1/16 amount of yeast;
  • ……

Here’s an example: if you want your dough to rise in 6 hours use 2,5 grams / 1/4 tbsp of granulated dry yeast or 6,25 grams / 1/8 tbsp of fresh yeast.

Soft and Doughy Pizza By The Slice (Italian Pizza al Taglio)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Soft and Doughy Pizza By The Slice like those you can find in an Italian bakery.
Author:
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
For the dough
  • 130 grams / 4.6 ounces / ½ cup milk (or water if you want a lighter version)
  • 200 grams / 7 ounces / 1 cup water* (less if using a steamed potato read below)
  • 10 grams / 1 tbsp granulated active dry yeast or 25 grams / ½ tbsp fresh yeast or 140 grams / 5 ounces mother yeast
  • 20 grams / 1½ tbsp unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 20 grams / ¼ cup instant mashed potatoes flour or 1 steamed and peeled potato (in this case use less water*)
  • 500 grams / 18 ounces / 4 cups all-purpose flour (or pizza/bread flour)
  • 10 grams / 1 full tsp sugar
  • 10 grams / 1½ tsp salt
For the topping
  • 1 cup plain chopped tomatoes sauce, plus a little pinch of sugar, salt to taste
  • other ingredients to your taste
  • fresh mozzarella, cut into 1.5 cm / 0.59 inches square pieces (making big pieces is important to prevent mozzarella from burning during the cooking time)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 230°C / 450°F / gas mark 8.
  2. Dissolve yeast in warm water and/or milk, sugar and butter, then mix all the ingredients (add the remain water and salt at last) to form a smooth, soft and no sticky dough (If it’s too sticky add a little flour otherwise add more water).
  3. Knead for about 20 minutes.
  4. Let rest for 5 minutes, cover your pizza pan with baking paper and roll out the dough.
  5. Cover with a lid or a plastic wrap to avoid the dough from drying and let rise for at least 2 hours (4 if using mother yeast).
  6. Dress pizza with tomato sauce, other ingredients to your taste and mozzarella.
  7. Bake for about 20 minutes.